Music

The Punk Singer - documentary cover imageHave you seen the documentary "The Punk Singer" yet?? It's on Netflix right now, and I loved it. A lot.

Some of you, particularly music lovers, will know who Kathleen Hanna is - she was lead singer of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre, and currently fronts (The) Julie Ruin. She was also one of the founders of the Riot Grrrl movement, which teenaged me growing up in Saskatchewan miraculously had some tiny window into, thanks to lots of MuchMusic, Sassy, and zines.

I was familiar enough with a lot of the bands and history covered in this documentary, but I also learned so much more about everything and how it all ties together. I was enthralled watching through the first two thirds of the movie that detailed the movement and music history, and Kathleen's role in it.

But then the film takes a major turn - one I had no idea was coming, when it reveals that Kathleen Hanna has been struggling for several years with severe chronic illness, eventually to be diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease. She speaks so candidly about how the illness has changed her life - it was actually hard for me to watch parts of it, because I related all too much... I found myself tearing up as she said many things that I've been feeling, and that despite my best efforts, I've continued to habitually minimize and hide behind a brave face.

There are at least a couple people in my life who've recently brought up the topic of nostalgia. It's not just thinking about or idealizing the past though, it's this recognition that there is something they're longing for that isn't present in their lives anymore. 

I feel it too. Sometimes I don't realize it until something twigs this burried memory of a feeling I can rarely tap into anymore.

Pride Parade

Sometimes you feel it in crowds, at a festival or a concert. Sometimes you feel it out in nature with people who are special to you. Or on a road trip driving late into the evening with the music blasting. Or your first time in a new city at sunset... 

I came across this again today, it's as wonderful as the first time I saw it. Had to share it here for posterity... 

It's been turned into a book now too. Tanya Davis wrote and performed the original poem.

I blame Jeff Rogers, Bon Iver, and a couple of inspiring friends (ie. my fitness idols) for what happened after work today: I exercised. 

Not just my occasional yoga routine, or slow lane puttering in the pool. I did a workout. I did a workout DVD. I did a workout DVD with Bon Iver. It involved squats, weights, and cardio, and some heavy breathing. Things that I haven't done in a long while.

From Huff Post

Before we get started, here's some new LCD Soundsystem for your listening enjoyment...

Much of my thoughts go like an agile retrospective these days... project management is permeating my thinking patterns.

Good

springy flowers

  1. Quiet
  2. Going back to the office
  3. Spring flowers
  4. Views ninja skillz
  5. Dropping my good camera hard and it being completely fine
  6. Clean desk
  7. Digesting = Energy
  8. Amazing girlfriends (even when some are far away)
  9. Apricot pate
  10. New Jay Malinowski album

Brace yourself, it's a random-assed post.

1) Out on Screen: had comp tickets (if you don't know what it is, it's Vancouver's queer film festival--and I'm going to use the word queer even though there was much discussion during the Q&A about preferred terms), and went to The Love that Won't Shut Up. It was a short film commissioned by Out On Screen's Queer History Project, made by Veda Hille and Ivan E. Coyote who both performed several songs/spoken word pieces. Bill Munroe (one of the people in the film) also performed. The film was mainly about different perspectives on the history of the queer community in Vancouver. It was great because I learned a lot that I didn't even realize I didn't know about the topic, and it also reminded me that (even though things seem super progressive living in the West End) there are still a lot of people out there who don't accept the queer community. There was still a tangible hurt in the room when topics such as gay bashing, gay marriage, and those who are no longer with us came up. I think it's easy to forget these things are still huge issues. I had a sad moment when I started thinking of one of my most favorite profs from my undergrad who died from AIDS in April of this year, and realized that probably everyone there knew him.

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